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Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 9:58 pm
by djw44
I like me a good Gewurztraminer. Atwater, Wagner and Swedish Hill Rieslings are fantastic. Finger Lakes wineries are great.

Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 11:48 am
by kunpc1
ginzo wrote:^^Does Canadian wine come in a bag like your milk?


Nah, we love our wine-in-a-box :b

Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:03 pm
by jps294
A construction photo of Alpine FreeFalls has been posted to the parks Facebook page!

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Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2012 6:11 pm
by nhman93
The slides location seems really out of the way. I know their is a restroom and the path to the picnic shelters over their but ride or slide wise theirs not much close I wonder if their going to just bulid the que line on the side deck of the wavepool. Also the park need to put a dry ride or two back near the comet if you have been to the park you know what im saying when i say the comet is in a very odd location, the whole front of the great escape is just the theme park and then behind that is the water park and then all by itself behind that is the comet. The park was talking about moving the swing ride around where this freefall slide is being built a few years back but they never followed threw. It would really help if their where a few rides to attract more people back by the comet which despite being the parks best ride by far rarely has over a couple train wait.

Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2012 3:02 pm
by jps294
Energy makes a big splash
A high-voltage transmission system allows Great Escape to easily upgrade park's rides


QUEENSBURY — Amusement parks have to continuously be coming up with new rides and attractions to keep people coming back — and The Great Escape & Splashwater Kingdom in Queensbury is no exception.
"Every single year, we continue to add things and create additional demand," Don McCoy, president of The Six Flags Great Escape Properties, said Monday as he and busy workers were getting ready for the park to open next month. "We want something new to talk about every year."
This year, that's going to include an "extreme" water ride known as Alpine Freefalls that includes the Cliffhanger, a slide set six stories in the air that drops its passengers at an 80-degree angle — giving them the sensation they are in a 32 mph free-fall.
But the annual addition of new rides like the Alpine Freefalls this year or the Sasquatch two seasons ago, could not be sustainable had the park not upgraded its electric infrastructure.
Last year, the park had National Grid install a substation for the first time that can feed up to 5 megawatts of power from National Grid's high-voltage transmission system into the facility — roughly the equivalent needed for about 650 homes.
But before that, the Great Escape was simply on National Grid's local distribution network like any other business. But as rides and new attractions were added, new service lines kept having to be built into the park, an inefficient and unwieldy solution to dealing with the park's constant expansion.
It also made it difficult to plan the park's future operations. John Murphy, a National Grid manager in Glens Falls who manages the Great Escape's account, said the park "always invited us in early" to be informed of new rides before they were announced publicly so the utility could ensure enough power could be supplied.
"We were at the limits of our power in certain areas," McCoy said.
Now, with the park's new substation, which taps into a sub-transmission line less than a half-mile away at Round Pond, National Grid has also been able to free up 4 megawatts of power on the local distribution system that will allow for added reliability and capacity for new businesses and residential developments, all of which helps grow the Great Escape's local season-ticket base. The park recently lowered the season pass price to $59.99 per person for a family of four and is also allowing people to make monthly payments instead of paying the whole bill all at once.
"Our community is very, very important to us, all season long,'' McCoy said.



Click Here

Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 6:08 pm
by GayCoasterGuy
For my first post, I wanted to share this geeky art/picture of Comet. I've only been to the park once in 2006. Had a great time, even alone, and the Comet seriously kicked some butt. Really wish I could go back in time at ride it in it's original home at Crystal Beach (with old lap bars!). (Thanks to ernierocker for re-directing me. I could not find the Great Escape Discussion Thread when I went to post the first time.)

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Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 6:28 am
by robbalvey
main_LKGScreaminEagles.jpg

Screamin' Eagles!

Screamin’ Eagles Puts You in the Pilot Seat

Starting in Spring 2013 you will be able to take flight and pilot your very own flying scooter — known simply as a “flyer” by avid fans — on the all-new Screamin’ Eagles.

Every flight on this open-air centrifugal force ride decked out with eagles and blazing wild flames is guaranteed to be different than the last. Each flyer is designed to give you control over your own flight experience by letting you manually control the moveable front wing. As the Screamin’ Eagles starts spinning faster and faster, sending you soaring up high into the air, depending on your piloting skills you can simply just glide through the air or you can swing the flyer side-to-side, gain altitude, and nose dive with each revolution of speeds up to 40 mph. You are ultimately in control.

If you’re new to flyers and you’re looking for a mild ride, take some advice from the experts at Flyers Addicts Anonymous: Hold the front wing nice and steady throughout the duration of the ride. This creates a nice, smooth flight perfect for sighting seeing over the historic River D.

If you’re a little more adventurous and looking for a more heart-racing, blood-pumping flight, the experts at Flyers Addicts Anonymous recommend you familiarize yourself with and play around with maneuvering your front wing. You will pleasantly discover that strategically positioning your front wing in relation to things such as ride speed, wind direction, and the position in the ride’s natural dive cycle will lead to a much faster, intense, and completely unexpected wild flight with dips and dives!

The Screamin’ Eagles is a new generation of a classic ride rich in history. It harks back to the 1940s and 1950s when it was a huge fan favorite at theme parks across the country, allowing little boys and grown men alike to hop in and suddenly, if only briefly, become fighter pilots over the great Pacific. Even more interesting is that even though the flying scooter was sold and marketed by Bisch-Rocco Amusement Company it wasn’t originally meant to be a theme park ride. According to Flyer Addicts Anonymous, a group of avid flyer enthusiasts that travel the country for what they refer to as their “flyer fix”, the original open-air centrifugal force ride was actually originally developed and built by Alvin Bisch (1888-1965) in the early 1930s as an airplane pilot training device.

Flying on the Screamin’ Eagles is truly a one-of-a-kind experience because there really aren’t many rides out there that let you control your own ride experience.

Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 6:40 am
by 3Mutts
Good to see my home park get something other then a water park addition and I also think Flyers are pretty fun (especially if they allow snapping :airtime:)

Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 6:42 am
by SharkTums
It really is a good addition for this park.

Re: The Great Escape (TGE) Discussion Thread

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 6:54 am
by Moose
Quite an extensive write-up for flyers!

Fun addition to the park!