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Thu Aug 28, 2008 5:22 pm

verticalzero wrote:I love the Big 'Ol Brake Levers as well, such a great way to slow n stop a coaster.

The trains for Rye Playland Dragon are sexy, I bet there they don't have a seatbelt to hold you in, just hold-on to those "bars" :)


I assume you mean the Church trains in the thread's photo, right? The Morgan stock currently running on the ride (although sans seat belts) are a far cry from the Dragon's original trains. They were big, roomy, tracked oh so well ... and yes, rather sexy. ;)

Thu Aug 28, 2008 6:05 pm

Having just ridden Rye's Dragon for the first time a couple of weeks ago, it rode more like a "Scenic Railway" which is fine and all for what it is, but did the old trains give it any more "oomph?"

--Robb

Thu Aug 28, 2008 6:51 pm

Judge Roy Scream @ Six Flags Over Texas still utilizes manual brakes as well.

Thu Aug 28, 2008 7:12 pm

robbalvey wrote:Having just ridden Rye's Dragon for the first time a couple of weeks ago, it rode more like a "Scenic Railway" which is fine and all for what it is, but did the old trains give it any more "oomph?"

--Robb


Robb,

I know what you mean about The Dragon feeling like a Scenic Railway. It was built the year after the infamous Airplane as a more "traditional" ride. Seems the first Church ride was a bit too much for Playland's typical guest.

As for the original trains, I feel it did give the ride a little more pep and seemed to handle the tracking better. The Morgan trains -- just as they do on both CA Giant Dippers -- subract "something" from the overall experience.

One of my dreams is for someone to grab a train from the Puyallup Coaster (the only existing ride that still runs the original Church rolling stock) and sneak them onto the three remaining Church woodies.


-S

Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:38 pm

hipbrianhop wrote:I saw those old brakes, and when I saw them on photo's I thought they were for decoration.
When I was in Cedar point 7 years ago, I rided blue streak to. Were the brakes still there that year?
Nice update, brake fanatic ;)


No, I'm pretty sure the Blue Streak at CP lost the manual brake quite a while ago. The first time I went to Cedar Point was 1994, and although I can't quite remember if it had them then (probably not), I'm certain that by 2001 they had been replaced by the computerized brakes.

Regarding your first point about the handles looking like decoration, the Big Dipper at Geauga Lake had its manual brakes right up to the time Six Flags turned the park into Six Flags Ohio. When it was converted to computerized brakes, they left the handles still in the floor, inoperative but still there as decoration.

One final note about another "gone but not quite" coaster, it always amused me how the brakes on the Conneaut Lake Park Blue Streak curved around before reaching the station- which is not possible to do with squeeze brakes. Or Waldameer's Comet curved station. With hi tech squeeze brakes we lost the more interesting station and brake designs.

Fri Aug 29, 2008 7:38 am

Lakeside's Cyclone also still uses manual brakes.....

Fri Aug 29, 2008 11:23 am

Again, you guys with the historic coaster lessons are just sheer coaster gods! Love this stuff, and I have a brake lever fetish as well.

Brake-men almost never made mistakes. My exposure to them were at West View, Conneaut, Kennywood, Coney Island, Geauga Lake, and Idlewild, and it really does add to the experience for me, it's watching old-world mechanics at work.

Damn you Kennywood for putting magnetic brakes on the Jack Rabbit. :cry: But at least they still utilize the old skid brakes on Thunderbolt and Racer, and the sound of the old hissing hydraulics that control them is another "characteristic of old technology" that's being lost as well.

Dennis

Fri Aug 29, 2008 12:19 pm

Don't forget about the Seabreeze Jack Rabbit.

Fri Aug 29, 2008 1:45 pm

DenDen wrote:Damn you Kennywood for putting magnetic brakes on the Jack Rabbit. :cry: But at least they still utilize the old skid brakes on Thunderbolt and Racer, and the sound of the old hissing hydraulics that control them is another "characteristic of old technology" that's being lost as well.

Dennis


If I remember correctly, they got rid of the old brake system because it stopped the trains rather violently. The new magnetic brake system, while it may lack nostalgia, slows the trains smoothly and consistently.

Sat Aug 30, 2008 7:14 am

Dennis,

Glad you enjoyed this one so much! And here I thought I was the only one with this shameful obsession. ;)

Oh, and cherish those memories you have of the West View coasters. Though I never to ride the Whippet, I did walk the tracks for an entire day the year before it came down. I loved the swoop from the valley up into the L-shaped brake run. Do you recall if there a one brakeman for each track or did one guy handle the operation?

-S

DenDen wrote:Again, you guys with the historic coaster lessons are just sheer coaster gods! Love this stuff, and I have a brake lever fetish as well.

Brake-men almost never made mistakes. My exposure to them were at West View, Conneaut, Kennywood, Coney Island, Geauga Lake, and Idlewild, and it really does add to the experience for me, it's watching old-world mechanics at work.

Damn you Kennywood for putting magnetic brakes on the Jack Rabbit. :cry: But at least they still utilize the old skid brakes on Thunderbolt and Racer, and the sound of the old hissing hydraulics that control them is another "characteristic of old technology" that's being lost as well.

Dennis
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