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GUIDE: Calculating Persons Per Hour

PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 3:31 pm
by Golfie
This is the most accurate equation I can think of to estimate a roller coaster's capacity per hour. Enjoy!



Let...

P = Persons Per Hour
C = Train Capacity
D = Ride Duration (Include loading time) (Change the time to a decimal [ex. 2:30 = 2.5 ; 2 1/2 minutes = 2.5 minutes - see below for more minutes to decimal conversions])
T = Number of Trains



Equation:

P = (C / D • 60)(T)


So, if I had a roller coaster that seated 36 people per train in 3 different trains and had a duration of 2:30 and an average loading time of 1:00, I would figure it out like so:

P = (36 / 3.5 • 60)(3)

I end up with about 1851 persons per hour.



Time to Decimal Conversion for Duration

Divide the number of seconds by 60. Round to the nearest hundredth (0.00)

PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 4:16 pm
by xascher
Thanks Golfie, Ive been needing something like this!

PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 4:33 pm
by Golfie
No Problem - it took a lot of thinking, so I'm glad it's being put to good use.

PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 8:41 pm
by BiCoastal Kid
Also, dont be dumb and put a 3:20 ride in as 3.20 when it should be 3.333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333

If you can't figure out the minute decimal form of your duration, just do it in seconds and change 60 to 3600.

seconds form

(3600*C*T)/D

PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 11:22 am
by Golfie
^But if you do it that way, make sure you have people per second instead of people per minute which my formula gets. (Take the people per minute [capacity divided by duration divided by 60])

PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 9:39 pm
by BiCoastal Kid
^No actually, the 3600 takes care of that. Both actually yield riders per hour.

Yours multiplies by 60 to compensate for the number of minute sin an hour, mine multiplies by 3600 for the number of seconds in an hour. Thye will both yield the same results.

I'll use your example:
(36 C * 3 T * 60 [mins/hour]) / 3.5 D[mins]
the minutes cancel out
1851 rph

(36 C * 3 T * 3600 [sec/hour]) / 210 D[sec]
seconds cancel
1851 rph

PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 9:53 pm
by ComplexAudio99
This is perfect. I have always been looking for a way to calculate this on No Limits. Thanks for spending the time to create this formula!

Re: GUIDE: Calculating Persons Per Hour

PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 7:09 am
by redunzelizer
Golfie wrote:This is the most accurate equation I can think of to estimate a roller coaster's capacity per hour. Enjoy!

Sorry, but I cannot enjoy that one...

Golfie wrote:Let...
P = Persons Per Hour
C = Train Capacity
D = Ride Duration (Include loading time) (Change the time to a decimal [ex. 2:30 = 2.5 ; 2 1/2 minutes = 2.5 minutes - see below for more minutes to decimal conversions])
T = Number of Trains

Equation:
P = (C / D • 60)(T)

So, if I had a roller coaster that seated 36 people per train in 3 different trains and had a duration of 2:30 and an average loading time of 1:00, I would figure it out like so:

P = (36 / 3.5 • 60)(3)

I end up with about 1851 persons per hour.


So, if I had a roller coaster that seated 36 people per train in 3 different trains and had a duration of 2:30 and an average loading time of 1:00,...

...and my trains would dispatch every 7 minutes (which equals 420 seconds), I would get a capacity of approx. 308 peeps per hour! (threehundred and eight!). Still there are three trains, 36 persons per train, and 1:00 loading time, and 2:30 ride time.

BTW: with german funfair dispatch (~ 28 seconds) the capacity with your example would be 4628(!) pph. Have three trains within the station (and a dozen more running...) and the loading time of 1:00 can easily be handled too.

So how's that? I'd humbly recomend you to start over...

PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 12:05 pm
by Golfie
^So the formula is accurate. I don't see what's wrong with anything but the dispatch time, because if it is 7 minutes, the pph will be substantially lower. Also keep in mind that this is a theoretical formula to have an idea of average capacity under certain conditions.

So duration includes ride time, loading time, and dispatch time? Because when I say loading time, I mean the time it takes for a full train to load and leave the station.

Could you clarify a little more?

PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 1:20 pm
by BiCoastal Kid
This still yields ideal results. The equation assumes perfect spacing between trains, no stacking. It's also instantaneous, assuming the load times at that moment would remain constant throughout.

Like he said, red, it's an estimation. It's saying the ride COULD get x number of people, not the ride IS getting.